In the UK, companies are not planning to go virtual, despite – or because of – the forced use of teleworking for over a year. This is according to a survey commissioned by the UK government itself. The survey was conducted earlier this year by Ipsos MORI among 465 executives. ” Companies expect the proportion of employees travelling for business and the frequency of their business travel to return to just below pre-pandemic levels,” summarised the authors of the report, published in early August. In detail, however, two out of five companies expect to make fewer trips…

In the UK, companies are not planning to go virtual, despite – or because of – the forced use of teleworking for over a year. This is according to a survey commissioned by the UK government itself. The survey was conducted earlier this year by Ipsos MORI among 465 executives. ” Companies expect the proportion of employees travelling for business and the frequency of their business travel to return to just below pre-pandemic levels,” summarised the authors of the report, published in early August. In detail, however, two out of five companies expect to travel less, with 27% planning to travel slightly less and 14% much less. On the other hand, surprisingly, more than a quarter of respondents expect to increase travel. In 30% of cases, the volume of travel is expected to remain stable.

However, the experience of video conferencing seems to have convinced UK executives overall. Half of them (50%) now believe that meetings with only virtual participants are an adequate replacement for face-to-face meetings. Only 28% of respondents oppose this view.

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British companies have had time to get a clear picture of the pros and cons of using virtual communication. According to the survey, more than nine out of ten companies (93%) have replaced domestic business travel with virtual meetings during the crisis, with 44% of respondents replacing all travel and 41% replacing at least half of travel.

A reduction in the proportion of car travel compared to levels achieved during the pandemic

Like the results of previous surveys, it is above all the use of private cars that is expected to decline in the coming months. ” Assuming that the restrictions are no longer in place, companies expect to use a similar mix of modes of travel to that used before the pandemic – that is, a return to long-distance rail and domestic air travel, and a reduction in the proportion of car travel compared to the levels achieved during the pandemic ,” the authors of the report point outport.