The appetite of travellers for long-distance travel has changed forever “: this is the conclusion, to say the least, drawn by Roland Berger in its latest report. The firm estimates that, once the pandemic is over, the number of personal trips will have decreased by 20%. As for business travel, it should be even harder hit: ” With the worldwide adoption of videoconferencing, business travel should decrease even more, according to the same survey: we forecast a 24% drop in long-distance travel in the United States and Europe, and 21% in China

. Figures based on…

The appetite of travellers for long-distance travel has changed forever “: this is the conclusion, to say the least, drawn by Roland Berger in its latest report. The firm estimates that, once the pandemic is over, the number of personal trips will have decreased by 20%. As for business travel, it should be even harder hit: ” With the worldwide adoption of videoconferencing, business travel should decrease even more, according to the same survey: we forecast a 24% drop in long-distance travel in the United States and Europe, and 21% in China

. These figures are based on the testimony of some 7,000 travellers in the three markets mentioned.

air travel and business travel will be the slowest sectors to recover

Admittedly, the report anticipates a post-Covid “revenge travel” effect: ” After the pandemic, (…) the number of trips should increase by 1%, due to a catch-up effect and impatience on the part of travellers wishing to travel “. But the desert crossing that market players have been in for almost two years is likely to prove particularly long according to Roland Berger, whose report predicts that ” air travel and business travel will be the slowest sectors to recover, according to our data, with business travel in Europe not reaching 2019 levels until 2030

“. Roland Berger The Roland Berger report points out the developments to be expected in the field of business travel

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For the authors of the report, this more than sluggish recovery can be explained in particular by a particularly notable “video effect” in the field of business travel. Although ” videoconferencing cannot replace holidays or personal meetings with friends and family “, as Roland Berger reminds us, ” organisations have increasingly adopted videoconferencing, thus dematerialising many economic, educational and civic activities “. The authors continue: ” Telecommuting, telemedicine, remote education and remote courts are just a few of the use cases. For example, China’s Ministry of Land and Resources uses a digital platform to remotely connect employees in 34 locations

s, and videoconferencing is already used in British courts.

business travellers will venture away from the office less often, but for longer

The other obstacle to the resumption of business travel has the merit of wearing an eco-responsible veneer. According to Roland Berger, ” traveler awareness, green sustainability and mobility innovation will significantly change the demand for long-distance travel in the future. And the authors of the report put a figure on the direct impact of this green card: ” Awareness of the impact of travel coupled with a rationalisation of travel is expected to continue, leading to a 12% drop in business travel alone in Europe after the pandemic “. For Didier BrĂ©chemier, partner at Roland Berger, ” the demand will be different – people will travel more by train on certain distances, for example, passengers will look for environmentally friendly airlines and business travellers will venture away from the office less often, but for longer periods of time.