Cirium, a company that analyses aviation activities, launched its “Global Aircraft Emissions Monitor” at the beginning of November. This measuring instrument gives a very precise idea of the CO2 emissions and fuel consumption generated by airlines.

To obtain its global aviation emissions report card, Cirium uses a series of indicators based on hundreds of flight and aircraft variables for maximum accuracy. These variables include actual flight and taxi times, cabin configuration, aircraft empty weight, assumed cargo tonnage, aircraft type and…

Cirium, an aviation analysis company, launched its “Global Aircraft Emissions Monitor” at the beginning of November. This measuring instrument gives a very precise idea of the CO2 emissions and fuel consumption generated by airlines.

To obtain its global aviation emissions report card, Cirium uses a series of indicators based on hundreds of flight and aircraft variables for maximum accuracy. These variables include actual flight and taxi times, cabin configuration, aircraft empty weight, presumed cargo tonnage, aircraft and engine type, winglet equipment and aircraft age.

A drop in consumption not only linked to Covid

According to Cirium, airlines have burned 40% less fuel for flights in 2021 since the beginning of the year compared to the same period in 2019. Certainly, Cirium attributes the reduction in carbon emissions produced by the decrease in flights around the world. Reduction achieved due to the impact of Covid-19 on air travel. The number of flights tracked since the beginning of the year by the analysis company shows a 29% decrease compared to 2019.

Cirium notes that while fuel consumption has been on the rise since the beginning of 2021, this is primarily due to the recovery of domestic and international flights. However, this consumption remains much lower than it was in 2019, before the pandemic. Airlines have been operating their aircraft less. They are also favouring more fuel-efficient aircraft.

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For Cirium, carbon emissions and kerosene consumption are increasingly the focus of the industry. This concerns airlines, airports, aircraft manufacturers, air traffic management authorities and fuel suppliers.

Recovery will boost consumption by 2039

While aviation has reduced its emissions overall this year, the recovery in travel is expected to reverse this trend from 2022. Cirium forecasts a global recovery to 2019 levels potentially by 2023.

At the same time, Cirium estimates that an expansion of the world fleet will result in fuel consumption of up to 485 million tonnes in 2039. This is equivalent to 1,530 million tonnes of CO2 emissions. This would certainly be a doubling of current aviation fuel consumption. However, this figure does not take into account sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) initiatives or fuel offsets.

Explaining the reasons for the comprehensiveness of the Cirium Global Aircraft Emissions Monitor, Jeremy Bowen, CEO of the company noted at its launch that ” aviation’s goals of achieving net zero emissions by 2050 require a thorough understanding of all the elements required for flight operations. Cirium’s Global Aircraft Emissions Monitor therefore boasts the highest quality and validity of data.