However radical it may be, the measure is a logical continuation of the events that have taken place over the last few weeks in the British sky and especially on the ground, in the country’s main airport. British Airways has decided to stop selling its short-haul flights at Heathrow airport, as reported by the British media. They specify that the measure must be applied until August 15. It will nevertheless spare the other London and British airports. A measure which, if it is consistent with previous decisions, is not completely assumed by the company. Questioned…

As radical as it may be, the measure is in line with the events of the last weeks in the British sky and especially on the ground, in the main airport of the country. British Airways has decided to stop selling its short-haul flights at Heathrow airport, as reported by the British media. They specify that the measure must be applied until August 15. It will nevertheless spare the other London and British airports. A measure which, if it is consistent with previous decisions, is not completely assumed by the company. Questioned by Voyages d’Affaires about this interruption until mid-August, the spokesman for British Airways replied: ” This is what has been reported [by the media] and we do not dispute it”

This decision is explained by the difficult management – chaotic one might say – of the return to high traffic levels at the London hub. In mid-July, Heathrow management asked to limit daily traffic to 100,000 passengers. And British Airways has recently been practicing “Hate Selling” tickets, inflating fares to discourage passengers.

On certain dates, we have to stop sales to make sure we don’t exceed the Heathrow airport cap

The British Airways spokesman is nevertheless more dissert when it comes to underlining the role of the airport in this situation, and even sees this “strategy” as an “advantage”. ” Our priority is to get our customers off the ground as planned and to ensure that we are in compliance with Heathrow’s cap. To continue to meet our obligations under this cap (beyond the cancellations already made), we continually review the number of customers departing from LHR and manage the situation dynamically across our program – this may involve limiting the number of seats to be sold, but on certain occasions or dates, we have to stop sales to ensure we do not exceed the Heathrow Airport cap. The advantage of this approach is that we can protect existing bookings and if there is an operational disruption on the day (e.g. weather disruption or air traffic control restrictions), we have more seats availables to reassign customers who were unable to make their connections.