Since January 10, passengers buying a ticket on Air France-KLM have been charged what the company calls a “Sustainable Aviation Fuel Contribution”, in addition to the current eco-tax. This mandatory contribution means an additional cost ranging from 1 to 4 euros in economy class and from 1.50 to 12 euros in business class, depending on the distance. The new tax is also integrated on the group’s other brands. In this case KLM and Transavia.

This contribution is necessary as France has introduced on January 1 an obligation to incorporate 1% of sustainable fuel in aircraft refueling. This obligation,…

Since January 10, passengers buying a ticket on Air France-KLM have been charged what the company calls a “sustainable aviation fuel contribution”, in addition to the current eco-tax. This mandatory contribution means an additional cost ranging from 1 to 4 euros in economy class and from 1.50 to 12 euros in business class, depending on the distance. The new tax is also integrated on the group’s other brands. In this case KLM and Transavia.

This contribution is necessary as France has introduced on January 1 an obligation to incorporate 1% of sustainable fuel in aircraft refueling. This obligation, which follows the European Union’s objectives, will continue to progress over time. Airlines will have to use 2% biofuel in 2025, then 5% in 2030.

Between voluntary and mandatory contribution

The French government’s roadmap for the deployment of biofuels in the aviation sector is very ambitious. It indicates an “objective of substituting 50% of conventional fossil fuels with biofuels by 2050, consistent with achieving carbon neutrality in France by that date”.

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Air France is going even further in this fuel neutrality objective. It is offering its passengers the opportunity to voluntarily contribute to the purchase of sustainable fuel. Starting January 13, passengers will be able to make their contribution on the carrier’s website. “Each euro of voluntary contribution will be invested in the purchase of these fuels,” says Air France.

The very high production costs explain Air France’s decision. It is estimated that biofuel costs on average four to eight times more than traditional fuel. Hence its very low use in the airline industry. And this, despite a lower carbon footprint that reduces CO2 emissions by up to 80% compared to kerosene.

We can bet that Air France-KLM’s decision will be emulated…